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pedants society.jpeg

comma sense.jpeg




· Capital letters


- for addressing people: "Mum, where are you?", "Where are you, Mum?" (but not when you just name the person, "I saw your mum yesterday.")



· full stop


Vocabulary:
1.
full stop (UK)
Full_stop.png

the punctuation mark (.) used at the end of a sentence that is not a question or exclamation, after abbreviations, etc. Also called (US and Canadian): period.

period (USA)
Full_stop.png

the punctuation mark (.) used at the end of a sentence that is not a question or exclamation, after abbreviations, etc. Also called (UK): full stop.





2.
dot
dot.gif
dot com.jpg
a small, roundish mark made with or as if with a pen.

polka dot
polka dots.png

a dot repeated to form a pattern on a fabric.





3.
spot
spot 01.jpg

a mark made by something unwanted, such as dirt.


spot 02.jpg

a small blemish or other mark on the skin.


Abbreviations:
e.g.
= for example
exempli gratia (Latin)
i.e.
= that is
id est (Latin)
Both e.g. and i.e. are more often used in relatively formal writing than in informal writing or speaking.
In the 7th and 8th century most of the writers of that time used to write serious works in Latin or French. In the 15th century Latin grew in secular use (non-religious writings, such as scientific writings).
Nevertheless, the use of Latin started to decline around the start of the 18th century (for example, Newton wrote his earlier works in Latin, bus his later in English).
Since all these people used to write in Latin, they would of course use e.g. and i.e. and get used to continue using them when writing in English.
At the same time, these writers had a strong knowledge of the most commonly used abbreviations (etc., et al., ca., cf., ibid., op cit.), along with scribal abbreviations (which are a form of abbreviation that combines letters and from which we get #, $, £, %, &, ‰, lb, &c. §) and the practice of doubling for plurals (pp. for pages, SS for saints, §§ for sections, etc.).


hunters.jpeg

Hunters, please use caution when hunting. Pedestrians (are) using walk trails.


thank you for visiting.jpg

Thank you for visiting. See you again soon.




· comma


Lets eat grandpa.jpg



eat your dinner.jpg


I love cooking my dogs and my family.jpg


toilet only.jpg



Defining relative clauses: This is the student who won the class competition.




· speech marks


- unnecessary quotation
non-smoking-restaurant-quote.jpg
This is a non-smoking restaurant.


italic
being or relating to a style of printing types in which the letters usually slope to the right.

















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